Slowly Becoming Canadian The Podcast – Episode 04 – Canadian food

Food 2

Fellow pub food enthousiast Heather and I sit down to enjoy a very Canadian meal and discuss (mostly late night) food etiquette. The menu might not be the healthiest but it’s delicious: Caesar (the drink, obviously, not the salad), donair (Halifax’s new official food), poutine and Timbits. We also talk about nachos, BBQ, lobster, and of course maple syrup.

You can also listen to the episode on iTunes.

Bon appétit!

 

 

Slowly Becoming Canadian The Podcast – Episode 03 – Living in remote Canada

Slowly Becoming Canadian - Episode 03 - Living in remote Canada

Helen (who used to live ELEVEN HOURS North of Edmonton, AB) joins me to talk about what it is like to live in an isolated Canadian community: do groceries for 9 months, be pregnant when the closest hospital is more than an hour drive away, get licked by a bear and much more.
We also find out how many car accidents per year in Canada involve moose. It’s probably more than you think.

You can stream this episode directly on Soundcloud or on iTunes.

Don’t forget, if you subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, the episodes will automatically be added to your library!

Where many people started to slowly become Canadian

If you visit/live in Halifax, NS, you have to visit Pier 21. There is so much to see and so much to learn.

If you immigrated to Canada, you’ll see how people like you helped shape this country and how it helped them in return.

If you were born here, you’ll see how Canada – and you – has welcomed and continues to welcome and help so many people from everywhere.

Multiculturalism can sometimes be a very abstract idea. When you listen to these stories and see what happened in that place, it becomes very concrete. It is about people from Everywhere making a new Here.

 The Canadian Immigration Room

It is filled with great pictures, stories and very interesting facts

The Immigration Office

Look at that sassy lady with the sunglasses just about to enter Canada

The Immigration Office

The officer behind that desk was the person who decided to let you in or not.

And if you’re very nice, you’ll get to take a picture with Fenton, the museum’s mascot. Come on, look at him, you know you want to!

Slowly Becoming Canadian Podcast on iTunes

Today is International Podcast Day (yes, for real) and it’s also the day Slowly Becoming Canadian The Podcast becomes available on iTunes.

Click on the link below and you’ll be redirected. You’ll have access to all the episodes. And if you subscribe, they’ll be automatically downloaded to your library.

If you enjoy it, please rate and/or review it!

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/slowly-becoming-canadian/id1044900233

French debate: Let’s see how the leaders speak French

 Le débat des chefs
If you don’t speak French, chances are you didn’t watch the French debate “Le Débat des Chefs”.
Don’t worry, I watched it for you. I can’t vote in this election because I am not a Canadian citizen. So I decided  to focus not on what the leaders were saying but how they were saying it. Here are 32 thoughts doing so:
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(0. Nobody looks like they’re going to cook anything. Apparently we’re talking about another kind of “chefs”)
1. The debate is in French, so your name will be pronounced as a French name.
2. His name is not Mülker! It’s Mulcair!
3. Elizabeth, come see me for some French lessons
4. Gilles Duceppe a.k.a “I’m the only real francophone here”
5. Harper made a lot of progress with his French since the 2010 debate
6. French mayhem!! Tout le monde parle!
7. Trudeau is the only one who sounds the same in French and in English
8. Reassuring fact: Leaders can talk for 2 minutes and say nothing in French, too.
9. This debate looks more like a debate in France: everybody talks at the same time and tries to speak louder than everyone else.
10. This is a French debate, so let’s make it about Quebec. Forget about the rest of the francophones.
11. Gilles just said “Interdire un vote à visage découvert”. Y’all hear that? Cover your face, when you vote. (he obviously meant the opposite)
12. “Moderateur” is apparently the French word for “I am useless”.
13. Elizabeth is talking about aboriginal women when asked about the niqab. Did she understand what they were talking about or just decided to talk about something completely different?
14. It’s not easy to make promises in French when it’s not your first language.
15. Who’s this M. Mülker they keep talking about?
16. Refering to Jean Coutu. This one is obviously not for you francophones from outside Québec.
17. Gilles Duceppe is here to remind you of Quebec. Don’t forget: Je me souviens.
18. – You have 5 seconds. Madame May.
– Nous.. nous.. nous devons…
– Time’s up, thank you Madame May.
19. Debating in your second language is very hard and very frustrating.
20. Elizabeth’s French isn’t bad. It’s just hard for her to jump into the conversation. Spontaneity will come with practice, keep practicing, Liz!
21. Journalist apologized to kids – as if kids were watching this – for using the word “dégoutés” (disgusted). I think that’s okay, monsieur.
22. Gilles just dropped the M word: la monarchie.
23. Justin just remembered it’s actually easy for him to speak French. He suddenly sounds more confident and passionate.
24. 1h07 into the debate: French and English languages are used to oppose different parts of the country.
25. French isn’t Harper’s and May’s first language and they’re getting tired because they have to concentrate harder than the others. So now, they’re talking less.
26. They’re now talking about the environment. Elizabeth, this is your field. I hope you did your French homework.
27. Fun fact: Leaders nod with disdain in French the same way they do in English.
28. “Québec, la belle province” – Gilles Duceppe (every 7 minutes)
29. “Québec” might be tonight’s most-used word.
30. Harper’s body language is the same whether he’s speaking French or English, which is not the case for everybody using a second language. Psycholinguistics shows it’s usually a sign of confidence.
31. First “faux-ami” of the night- used by May: “actuellement” doesn’t mean “actually”.
32. Harper’s accent is getting weirder and weirder. I’ve been there, it’s normal when you’re not used to speak another language. But his accent is really weird, almost Russian sometimes.
 –
 –

French report cards for tonight:

MayYou made some progress. Join a conversation class and practice spontaneity.
 –
 –
 –
You obvioHarpperusly paid attention in French class. Now, work on your prononciation because you sound kind of weird.
 –
TrudeauHesitations on some words at the beginning but after a while you remembered you grew up speaking French.
 –
Mulcair
French or English, that’s not a problem for you. Bien joué!
 –
DuceppeObviously, no issue with the language. Just remember, you can speak French with non-quebecers, too.

Slowly Becoming Canadian The Podcast – Episode 2

Urban planning in Canada

Urban planner @tealuke and I talk about cities in Canada:
Why there isn’t more of them, how there design influences people, the differences with French cities…


We also play “Real place in Canada or something I just made up”. Find out if Nottawa, ON and Climax, SK are real Canadian towns!

 

Slowly Becoming Canadian The Podcast – Episode 1

NFL, MLB, NBA, WHAT?!

North American sports are all very confusing to me and I’m always lost when people talk about them. I sat down with sports connoisseur and friend, Damian Daniels, so he could help me a little.

Whether you love sports or you don’t care about it, listen to this episode. You’ll learn a thing or two, laugh, and find out if me guest would pass the Canadian citizenship test.

 

Game on! (That’s what you say, right?)